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MoroDashi
03-29-2008, 01:23 AM
Need help with Japanese manners? Well tag along to this thread! Here is an
example of how to ask:
User: How do I say thank you in Japanese?
~A couple of minutes or 1 day later~
Another User: It's ect. ect. ect.
So that's how it's works ^^ Remember to check back in a couple of days,
Have fun! ~MoroDashi!

riki94
04-26-2008, 03:02 PM
you know what this means??:

"Kawaki kitta nodo he nagashita
Kimi no na de kokoro wo uruoushiteku"

it is a anime song i cant find translation

rEikAbLeU
04-27-2008, 03:29 AM
"Kawaki kitta nodo he nagashita
Kimi no na de kokoro wo uruoushiteku"


"With your doing to the throat which finishes to dry it can, the concavity it has done heart"
that is the translation, i cant just seem to find the correct meaning or arrangement of the words...
i hope that helps you...
even a little... :sofa:

MistressPookyChan
04-27-2008, 11:00 PM
riki and erika, don't hijack a thread.

rEikAbLeU
04-28-2008, 12:49 AM
sorry!!!
i just answered her question, wont happen again...

(^^,)

Datenshi
04-28-2008, 09:38 AM
I'm sorry, but this is just too much to ignore, and anyhow there's nothing better to do on this board at the moment...

>Kawaki kitta nodo he nagashita
>Kimi no na de kokoro wo uruoushiteku
"I fill my throat with your name,
Quenching my heart drying with thirst"

Not to be entirely off topic, here's few quick pieces of advice related to chopsticks:
Don't pass things from chopstick to chopstick. This is considered extremely rude.
Don't stick your chopstick upright into a bowl of rice. These two things are done only at funerals, so it's in very bad taste.
Don't lay your chopsticks horizontally over your bowl. This signifies that you have had your fill, and may be insulting to your host.

rEikAbLeU
04-29-2008, 11:13 PM
is it really like that? are you a japanese? how about dressing up? is kimono a regular clothe to wear among old people in japan?

Ertai87
04-30-2008, 01:03 AM
I'm sorry, but this is just too much to ignore, and anyhow there's nothing better to do on this board at the moment...

>Kawaki kitta nodo he nagashita
>Kimi no na de kokoro wo uruoushiteku
"I fill my throat with your name,
Quenching my heart drying with thirst"

Not to be entirely off topic, here's few quick pieces of advice related to chopsticks:
Don't pass things from chopstick to chopstick. This is considered extremely rude.
Don't stick your chopstick upright into a bowl of rice. These two things are done only at funerals, so it's in very bad taste.
Don't lay your chopsticks horizontally over your bowl. This signifies that you have had your fill, and may be insulting to your host.

Wow good to know! I'm going to Japan in about a week and a half, and I usually do both of the last 2, although when I put my chopsticks over my bowl it means I'm stuffed, so I suppose it would be correct then XD

aka-ba-ra-hana-wabi-ra
04-30-2008, 01:41 AM
Need help with your japanese manners?
Come here and learn the in's and out 's of Japanese manners!
Just aska question- And check back in at least a day to see
the answer! An example:
User: How do I say thank you?
Me or someone else will say the answer.
Its perfect if your a tourist living in Japan!

-Anime_candy.

wellUser: How do I say thank you? = ari gatohow are you? = Genki? but the proper way would be O Genki Desu ka?Answer back would be --> Genki Desu.well I feel lazy typing xD so maybe more next time. =P

Ertai87
04-30-2008, 01:47 AM
It's just respect. Adding the "O" is just a more respectful way, and adding "desu" is also for respect, although I think "O" is respect for health, while "desu" is respect for the person you're talking to. I commonly use "Ogenki?" or "Nani shiteiru no?" (the latter is closer to "what's up?", since I can't get used to the idea of asking "how are you?").

Disclaimer: I'm not Japanese, and my understanding of the language is mediocre at best. I apologize if I'm blatantly wrong on anything I've said here.

Datenshi
04-30-2008, 06:29 AM
is it really like that? are you a japanese? how about dressing up? is kimono a regular clothe to wear among old people in japan?

Yeah, I am a native Japanese born and raised (well, on and off) and I'm currently attending a Japanese university.

This thread is really not the place to ask random questions like that (we already have a warning for hijacking, remember?) so I'd appreciate it if you'd gave me a P.M.

But since you already asked, it's not "regular clothing" (most old people wear trousers and shirts/sweaters or dresses like anywhere else in the world) though it isn't unusual for an old lady walking around town wearing a kimono. It's just not common. Usually wearing a kimono is only reserved for special occasions like weddings, though the men pretty much stick to suits and ties no matter what the occasion.

Again, to stay on topic:
1. It is considered customary to make slurping sounds when eating noodles, as a sort of "compliments to the chef", so don't be surprised when you enter a noodle shop.
2. A typical Japanese meal consists of a bowl of rice, miso soup, and a dish of fish or meat and vegtables. When eating such a meal, it's considered proper to eat a little bit of each portion (as opposed to finishing all of your rice, without touching anything else, before moving on to your miso soup, and so on one dish at a time). However, a lot of young people do this nowadays and the rules are very lax so I wouldn't worry.

-> Ertai87-san

(the latter is closer to "what's up?", since I can't get used to the idea of asking "how are you?").
Another way to say it could be "saikin (choushi) dou?"

MistressPookyChan
05-01-2008, 06:04 AM
Never knew about the laying chopsticks across the bowl rule! I must hang out with impolite people. XD

About the kimono thing: hardly anyone wears them anymore, but it is becoming chic again. I often see people wearing kimono when they go out with friends shopping, to a concert, etc. Maybe kimono is becoming trendy again. ;) Anywho, don't worry. You don't have to wear one in front of the elderly.

Datenshi
05-01-2008, 06:14 AM
About the kimono thing: hardly anyone wears them anymore, but it is becoming chic again.

Yeah, especially yukata. You see a lot of women wearing them during the summer festivals and I find it very pretty.

Wearing kimono is a bit of a hassle for women (tradition demands a lots of rules you have to follow when wearing one) but there are many classes you can take to learn how to wear them these days so I do think they are becoming somewhat of a fashion. Kimono for men are actually very comfortable to wear - I'd actually wear it to school if not for the fact that not many people do D:

MistressPookyChan
05-01-2008, 06:17 AM
Not only are there kimono classes, there are also fake obi! the usually come in two pieces (the "bow" part and the "belt" part) and then put them together. I still prefer tying my own, though. :3

So, to the OP, wear a yukata if you have a chance. It's a lot of fun, and for some reason, Japanese people love putting foreigners/non-Japanese people in them. (should have seen their faces when they realized I could put it on better than they could. muhahaha)

Nytyngayl
05-02-2008, 01:15 AM
I`m at Kyoto Gaidai right now, and the weekends I head out to Kawaramachi-dori for shopping and whatnot, without fail I see at least one woman in a kimono.

I`ve also seen veritable hordes of girls dressed that way. My teachers tell me that it`s because all (or at least most) of the girls who want to become geishas come to Kyoto, but I`m not certain how true that is.

MoroDashi
05-04-2008, 11:43 PM
wellUser: How do I say thank you? = ari gatohow are you? = Genki? but the proper way would be O Genki Desu ka?Answer back would be --> Genki Desu.well I feel lazy typing xD so maybe more next time. =P

^^ It's an example silly :P

peardruid
05-05-2008, 09:21 PM
If I'm not mistaken it's also considered rude by some to place your chopsticks with the points facing to your front, particularly if you're seated at a table with another person seated directly opposite you. The safest way to place your chopsticks when you don't need them for the moment is to place them on a rest, with the points facing your left and the chopsticks parallel to your front.

Do correct if I'm wrong, please.

kero koinu
05-08-2008, 02:54 AM
Hey, with honourifics like 'chan' and 'sama' there is kun, like my brother (his name's Kyle), I would call him Kyle-kun right?
well my question is that i've heard people say it to women as well. isn't 'kun' just for boys? or is it for boys AND girls?
And how honourific is 'dono'?
(Sorry, i know this must be hard to read, but i'm curious).:(

MoroDashi
05-08-2008, 05:30 AM
Hey, with honourifics like 'chan' and 'sama' there is kun, like my brother (his name's Kyle), I would call him Kyle-kun right?
well my question is that i've heard people say it to women as well. isn't 'kun' just for boys? or is it for boys AND girls?
And how honourific is 'dono'?
(Sorry, i know this must be hard to read, but i'm curious).:(

Yes, you would call your brother Kyle-Kun.
And for girls it's San. Let's take my wanted name ^^,
Lolly. If I were your sister, you'de call me "Lolly-San."
It's not the same. In general, you'de call me, "Lolly-chan."
Same for guysers...
Ect. Ect.
Tank-yoo..
Anime_Candy

MoroDashi
05-08-2008, 05:34 AM
Yeah, especially yukata. You see a lot of women wearing them during the summer festivals and I find it very pretty.

Wearing kimono is a bit of a hassle for women (tradition demands a lots of rules you have to follow when wearing one) but there are many classes you can take to learn how to wear them these days so I do think they are becoming somewhat of a fashion. Kimono for men are actually very comfortable to wear - I'd actually wear it to school if not for the fact that not many people do D:

Yeah I wore at last year's Summer Festival and New Years.
I haveto. Because I usually attend new years parties or sometimes
festivals. I also take the lucky sticks. Mine actually told me truth O_o..
A lucky stick is usually when you pick a stick and the person at the
stall gets the card number of what your stick says. Mine said "4" So The person behind the counter/stall got me a card staying "4" This year will bring you luck ect. ect.

Ertai87
05-08-2008, 12:21 PM
Hey, with honourifics like 'chan' and 'sama' there is kun, like my brother (his name's Kyle), I would call him Kyle-kun right?
well my question is that i've heard people say it to women as well. isn't 'kun' just for boys? or is it for boys AND girls?
And how honourific is 'dono'?
(Sorry, i know this must be hard to read, but i'm curious).:(

My understanding is that it works like this (keep in mind I'm a gaijin from Canada and never set foot in Japan in my life, although that's going to change in about 4 days ^_^):

Normally, if you're just meeting someone or in a casual business relationship, you use "san". If you're talking to someone who's a friend who's the same age as you, you use "kun" (boy or girl). If you're talking to a little kid or to a girl who's younger than you, or to someone you like, you can use "chan" (hence Naruto always calling Sakura "chan" in the anime). If you're talking to someone who you should show respect to, or who's doing a professional service (especially service providers to customers, I've noticed), you use "sama". If you're talking to someone really high up like the Emperor of Japan or whatever, you use "dono". If you're talking to a really close friend or to a family member, you don't have to use any title. Also, you almost always use last names (family names, whatever) unless you're really close to the person or they're a family member (although I've called 2 of my Japanese profs by their first names, which is kind of weird, but whatever...)

midnightfoxgirl99
05-08-2008, 05:04 PM
Here's a link to a website that tells how to correctly do suffixes for names. Hope it helps~
http://www.jref.com/language/japanese_suffixes.shtml

HolyArch
05-16-2008, 08:34 AM
~_~ Thank you everyone for the infos.. I read it and I appreciate it.. I'm just learning as many as I can in japanese so thank you again..

teddy529
05-20-2008, 04:51 PM
when greeting someone you must bow, and the deeper the bow is the more respect it shows.
and use the correct honorifics depending on who you are greeting.