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Kuitchi
08-18-2007, 01:10 AM
I don't know what is the Japanese of "whaiting in our town for the trian", pls help me.:(

harimakenji_scramble
08-18-2007, 04:52 AM
Did you meant to say, "waiting in our town for the train"?

in that case, it would be 「私の住んでる町で電車をまっている」
not the exact translation but the message is the same.

Kuitchi
08-18-2007, 08:49 AM
Thaks you harimakenji_scramble!:D

harimakenji_scramble
08-19-2007, 03:05 AM
no problem. ^_^

MiKowaii
08-23-2007, 02:20 AM
Then, if it's not a problem of course, I would like to ask a question too...
...or 2...:

1. What's the use of "tette" form?
2. And same question for "teru" form?
and "unexpected"
3....use of "sasete" form...

Sorry to bother, but it's holiday and I can't ask my teacher... :(

VraieEsprit
08-28-2007, 01:23 PM
I'm not totally sure if this is what you're asking, but I think it is..

You mean like when someone writes/says 'matteru' or 'ikiteru' or 'nonderu'...etc?

Basically it's the -te form of the verb (ie matte, ikite, nonde) plus the verb iru (to be/have). It's I guess the Japanese equivalent of the continuous tense...

Properly it's 'matte iru' or 'matte imasu' - (I'm waiting). But in speech and sometimes in text it's contracted down to matte'ru (matteru). Just like in English we say I'm instead of I am, or it's instead of it is. Just the Japanese don't use apostrophes with the kana so its less easy to spot if you're not aware of it :)

It's easier when people write it with the apostrophe in romanised text, just because it makes the contraction clearer if you're not used to spotting it.


I'm pretty sure that the -tette ending you're asking about is the same idea too - only with 'itte', the -te form of iku (to go).

I've noticed that verbs often get put together like this...but particularly with iru, iku and kuru. But because iru and iku start with an i, the sound can be slurred into the end of the verb before and that's when the 'i' disappears.

Is that any help at all??

Vraie

shinnraiu
08-28-2007, 11:27 PM
Then, if it's not a problem of course, I would like to ask a question too...
...or 2...:

1. What's the use of "tette" form?
2. And same question for "teru" form?
and "unexpected"
3....use of "sasete" form...

Sorry to bother, but it's holiday and I can't ask my teacher... :(

sasete means like you make someone do something
"tabesaseru" - make someone eat something
Like that kinda. Usually. I hope I translated that right.

Datenshi
08-29-2007, 05:48 AM
>tette
I suspect this isn't a set 'form', but simply a contraction of ~ていって。 いって being a combination of '行く' (go) and 'って' (a request).

For example,
私をあなたと連れてって = 私をあなたと連れていって = 私をあなたと連れて行って
->Please bring me with you

As for (3), Shinnraiu-san is correct, but you'll need to remember that there is another usage of 'saseru' which means 'allow ~ to'.

So, for example, 食べさせる can mean both 'make someone eat something' and 'allow someone to eat something', depending on the context.

In this case, 'sasete' should be more like 'allow me to ~'. e.g. 食べさせて = let me eat.

MiKowaii
08-31-2007, 08:07 AM
Thank you all very much.
Especially for '~tette ~te itte' part 3

皆ありがとうございます。