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View Full Version : Why did Shinji masturbate over Asuka in the movie?



AniAsker
12-31-2007, 05:47 PM
In "End of Evengelion" Shinji masturbates over Asuka's comatose body. Is there any meaning to this, why he does it?

Manhattan_Project_2000
12-31-2007, 06:14 PM
Anno commenting on certain unhealthy aspects of Otaku Culture, and at the same time an insight into Shinji and Asuka's relationship from Shinji's point of view.

Saracin
12-31-2007, 09:59 PM
Oh, and here I thought it was about men only thinking with their wang.

Just kidding though. Thats a deep anime that makes you think on so many levels. What just seems like a perverted act can have a much deeper feeling. Plus add in Shinji's repressed sex drive. He's so afraid of being rejected he'd never make an attempt to sleep with anyone. So when he sees Asuka, laying there, so beautiful, so pure, and no for him to be rejected...Its disgusting, but you have to feel sorry for the kid. He might die before he ever even sleeps with a girl.

Ligno
01-04-2008, 02:26 PM
Well... I HATE Shinji and when he does that... well... ^^U In my opinion it was, no a dramatic or filosofical scene, but a really disgusting moment where you see how weak and how stupid is Ikari Shinji!!!

Saracin
01-04-2008, 10:13 PM
You are right that he's weak. He seems to spend every second going "FATHER! I don't want to pilot. I don't want to be depended on. I'm worthless. FATHER!"

dollmage
01-05-2008, 06:38 AM
but dont you like shinji when he goes nut's and kill enemies like a bloody demon.

there is one episode in which his eva. go berserk yet it seems to be controled by shinji's emotions in which his eva looses an arm but he cuts the angel and uses a part of it and connects it to himself as his arms and his eva eat the freakin angel. @_@

(umm did i wrote everythin correctly it was so long ago when i watched it)

Saracin
01-05-2008, 06:48 AM
You had it right. But I'm not sure if it was his emotions that time, I thought he was unconscious and the angel that was inside the EVA was unleashed. Not really sure, been awhile for me too.

El-ahrairah
01-08-2008, 11:40 PM
and the angel that was inside the EVA was unleashed.
Angel?? I'm sorry but did I miss an episode or something?

El-ahrairah
01-08-2008, 11:43 PM
and how stupid is Ikari Shinji!!!

How does that make him stupid? Most males with access to pornography have done essentially the same deed, are they stupid too?

MomijiTMO
01-08-2008, 11:46 PM
Yes he did. He's 14. He's just entering manhood. Asuka is the only woman figure in his life. Rei is a motherly figure. There.

Saracin
01-08-2008, 11:48 PM
Angel?? I'm sorry but did I miss an episode or something?

Sorry, might be a little off. The Eva's were clones of the first angel, Adam, so in a sense they themselves are angels.

Manhattan_Project_2000
01-08-2008, 11:51 PM
Angel?? I'm sorry but did I miss an episode or something?

Unit 01 is made from the angel Lillith and Shinji's mother. Wikipedia says this is mentioned in the "deleted scenes" (Directors's Cut?) of Episode 23.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel_%28Neon_Genesis_Evangelion%29#Lilith

wolfenstain2k7
01-08-2008, 11:54 PM
bottom line is Shinji is weak unit 01 eats the angel because he is a human and he gets crazy when the great Shinji is unconscious asuka is hot and he is a boy.

I nail it.......

MomijiTMO
01-08-2008, 11:57 PM
Yeah remember all Eva's need a soul and Unit 1's is Shinji's mum.

El-ahrairah
01-10-2008, 10:53 PM
Sorry, might be a little off. The Eva's were clones of the first angel, Adam, so in a sense they themselves are angels.
I see where you're coming from, but following the same thought, humans would also be considered angels, as they were created from Lilith. And if everyone's an angel, doesn't it loose the value?

El-ahrairah
01-10-2008, 11:06 PM
Unit 01 is made from the angel Lillith and Shinji's mother. Wikipedia says this is mentioned in the "deleted scenes" (Directors's Cut?) of Episode 23.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel_%28Neon_Genesis_Evangelion%29#Lilith
In the subbed version of one of the last episodes, Gendo calls unit 01 "Yui", also theres alot of hints in the series, such as in episode one, unit one saving Shinji. Yet another thing they say at some point in the series is that Yui was absorbed into unit 01.

El-ahrairah
01-10-2008, 11:13 PM
bottom line is Shinji is weak unit 01 eats the angel because he is a human and he gets crazy when the great Shinji is unconscious asuka is hot and he is a boy.

I nail it.......
Is it too hard to shift your right middle finger 1 cm down when you're typing?

Manhattan_Project_2000
01-10-2008, 11:17 PM
Quit triple-posting. Edit your post, learn UBB code, use the Multi Quote button, or all three.

Ikaruga
01-16-2008, 09:43 AM
Well back onto the topic, you could see it as the people here have previously mentioned. It could be a sign of his sexual repression, and of his fear of rejection. Though I wouldn't think of Shinji as being an otaku, I'm sure many other Japanese men would love to be in his place and do exactly what he did...

I mean, it's Asuka! :p

Stenchgirl
01-21-2008, 02:29 AM
That is a REALLY good question! I remember the first time I saw that i was so disgusted and creeped out by it, but when you think about it he was a sexually repressed 14 year old. I mean everyone has sexual urges and whatnot and maybe he thought he was going to die and that the world was ending and said "hell with it!" or maybe since she was unconscious he took it as an opportunity to play out his fantasies that he didn't think would ever come true without actually having to involve her. Or maybe he's sadistic and her mangled body excited him so much that he couldn't contain it. It's hard to say really because he's such a troubled characters, they're all troubled really. But Shinji's REALLY got problems! Lol!

Ikaruga
01-21-2008, 05:50 AM
That is a REALLY good question! I remember the first time I saw that i was so disgusted and creeped out by it, but when you think about it he was a sexually repressed 14 year old. I mean everyone has sexual urges and whatnot and maybe he thought he was going to die and that the world was ending and said "hell with it!" or maybe since she was unconscious he took it as an opportunity to play out his fantasies that he didn't think would ever come true without actually having to involve her. Or maybe he's sadistic and her mangled body excited him so much that he couldn't contain it. It's hard to say really because he's such a troubled characters, they're all troubled really. But Shinji's REALLY got problems! Lol!

Evangelion was a certificate 15, so it's not such a big deal. I agree with you on the sexual repression part, but it was more to do with his personality disorder and how his father brought him up to be.

I wouldn't think that he "knew" that the world was going to end, all he seemed to care about was everything staying the same, and obviously being with Asuka. I don't think it was a fantasy to masturbate over Asuka, though certainly many Otakus and American Anime fans masturbate over figures, if anything, I think he just wanted to have sex with her. He just wanted her, both emotionally and physically.

And I wouldn't say he was sadistic, otherwise he would have loved being in the Eva, killing Angels by tearing them up and all. But obviously he doesn't look like he wants to fight in the Eva at all.

blackrosetwilight
01-28-2008, 07:11 PM
I guess shinji knew the end was coming right? So he got to to have a lil happy time before his pathatic wussy life comes to an end.

daft
01-28-2008, 07:36 PM
I guess shinji knew the end was coming right? So he got to to have a lil happy time before his pathatic wussy life comes to an end.
LOL...sad, true, and simply put. Good job!

小美ドクロchan
01-28-2008, 09:04 PM
Um....I'd say Shinji did it for quite an obvious reason: Seeing Asuka half-naked turned him on.:rolleyes:

Manhattan_Project_2000
01-28-2008, 09:45 PM
Dear "Let's not analyze a postmodern film and take all the imagery at face value instead" People,


You are wrong and unqualified to watch this film. But mostly, you are stupid. Go back to bed.



Sincerely,
MP2K

小美ドクロchan
01-28-2008, 11:29 PM
That's not very nice. Aren't you supposed to be a mod? T_T

Saracin
01-29-2008, 12:24 AM
Careful Manhattan, she has a club that hurts. Trust me, I know!

Manhattan_Project_2000
01-29-2008, 08:17 AM
That's not very nice. Aren't you supposed to be a mod? T_T

Perhaps it isn't, but it is also true.

MobilepoopGundam
01-30-2008, 10:22 AM
Because he's whiny and pathetic.

King_Shadow89
01-30-2008, 11:32 AM
I am suprized that this thread hasn't gotten closed yet. Anyway cuz he was lonely and had nothing more to do lol.

maria89
01-30-2008, 11:36 AM
lol.

ghost_in_the_shell
01-31-2008, 10:01 PM
What a topic for a first post!

I remember that scene and doing a double take. I thought I had missed something - and I remember actually playing it back and being in shock that it indeed was what I thought it was.

I don't much insight to offer - I would like to hope it's shinji being a frustrated 14 yr old boy excited by the sight of his target of affections displayed half-nude - and realizing how "messed" up of an act it was.

Pardon that pun.

satsugai
02-13-2008, 01:00 AM
Okay, I really could go on about this but I'll just sum it up.

During EoE, having no one else to turn to, Shinji ended up begging Asuka for help.
Even though he knew she was unconscious, he still begged for her.
Since he was "closest" to Asuka after he learned about Rei, Asuka was his only source of empathy.

Basically, after pulling loose the vital lines, exposing her breasts, he became roused.
Shinji, being completely terrified of rejection, saw Asuka as someone who COULDN'T reject him.
So he gave into himself and afterword he became disgusted.

This first scene can explain why he feels no sadness or emotion when the JSSDF soldiers tried to kill him.


Either way this post can be read badly, but, I'm going to post it anyway.

Shinji 01
03-10-2008, 09:11 AM
Hi im new to these forums and fairly new to anime, so bare with me. I think personally the scene was a representation of human weakness. Shinji is only human and i think the scene was put in there to absolutly make this clear. Think of the responcibility placed on him throughout the series; i think the scene was added in to emphasise and remind the viewers that at the end of the day, shinji is a scared 14 year old child who is only human and consequently is prone to human weaknesses such as desire. I think the scene also confirms that shinji has an attraction to asuka.The scene tells us alot about shinji's state of mind as well. He is having some kind of mental breakdown; shown through his disgusting actions but he is also not completelly beaten which is shown through the fact that he still felt disgust and remorse at the end of the scene. He is a 14 year old suffering from a metal breakdown of some sort and heres the proof to remind you, is basically what I see the scene as saying. Its quite a brave scene to include to be honest and is one of those scenes that for me sets Evangelion apart from the rest.

Datenshi
03-10-2008, 09:33 AM
I'm rather wary of the whole postmodern fad myself. Sometimes wanking off is wanking off and sometimes it's a symbol of the repressed sex drive or some such. You don't know (or you're not supposed to know) for sure, and I've always thought that was actually the point of the thing, that uncertainity on a meta-level.

By the way, Sayonara Zetsubou Sensei had a joke where a guy went to watch the movie with his mother. That would be.... awkward.

IceBubleFlava
03-10-2008, 05:32 PM
Ummm.....I never seen Shinji masturbate, when did that happen. Can someone tell me, (I've watched the movie, and I did not see that scene. And I don't think Shinji's that weak.) but from what I know about boys, is they get HORNEY!!. So it was just like looking at a magazine page, with a naked girl on it. He couldn't control himself, and started..........ya' know, ya' know.

Manhattan_Project_2000
03-11-2008, 10:02 AM
I'm rather wary of the whole postmodern fad myself. Sometimes wanking off is wanking off and sometimes it's a symbol of the repressed sex drive or some such. You don't know (or you're not supposed to know) for sure, and I've always thought that was actually the point of the thing, that uncertainity on a meta-level.

By the way, Sayonara Zetsubou Sensei had a joke where a guy went to watch the movie with his mother. That would be.... awkward.

Postmodernism isn't a fad, unless you define all culture as a fad.

Anno's repeated and heavy use of symbolism (Especially in EoE) is freakishly obvious. To take this scene at face value seems absurd. Cinema, as practiced by artists like Anno isn't about telling a story, but is about communicating feelings through the medium of story. The scene, taken at face value, is so jarring and semi-disturbing that no hack director would leave it in because it interferes with the flow of the story, is pointless, and has development costs like any segment of animation. So there must be some sort of statement in it that justifies it's inclusion. As it is postmodern, you are free to interpret the scene how you wish, but "HE WUZ HORNY" is completely invalid.

Datenshi
03-11-2008, 11:00 AM
Feh. I'm going to hate myself later for this.

I'd say whether postmodernism was a fad or not, although an interesting premise, isn't appropriate for discussion here, as we'd have to define precisely what postmodernism is in the first place. What I can say for certain is that there was a brief and very distinct rise and fall in the popularity of French postmodernist thought among universities in Japan from the eighties to the nineties (cf. Asada Akira, Kojin Karatani, and most recently Azuma Hiroki, the last of which incidentally is known for his postmodernist interpretations of Japanese subculture) which many thinkers label as a fad. Whether the same extends to popular thought abroad I hadn't thought to consider in my earlier post (but from what little I've read of Terry Eagleton it appears it is a similar case in the United States) and I apologize for my sloppish use of terminology.



As it is postmodern, you are free to interpret the scene how you wish, but "HE WUZ HORNY" is completely invalid.

Let me rephrase what I said in my previous post. I didn't think anyone would respond and so I see my wording was inadequate. I wasn't saying that the scene in question was included for no reason. If anything I agree with you; I'm saying there is an infinite variety of possible interpretations, and I think one of those interpretations include the possibility that the scene was inserted simply to shock audiences.

I'm not denying people the pleasure of picking a particular interpretation of their choosing from the myriad of possibilities. However, I simply wanted to point out that were we to attempt a truly postmodern critique of the scene in question, playing a guessing-game with the author's intentions would be self-defeating because as Barthes coined it, "the author is dead". If we were to enjoy Neon Genesis Evangelion as a postmodern work (I want to stress here there are of course other, more popular ways to enjoy it which everybody is perfectly entitled to), then the only choice left to us in my opinion is to purposefully avoid fixing a meaning to the scene, and enjoy the confusion and disruption it causes to our complacent movie-goer sensibilities on a meta-textual level.

Lady_Baneheart_Of_Blades
03-11-2008, 11:49 AM
eeww! does that really happen in the movie. -_- I'm not going to watch that.

Thingle
03-11-2008, 01:31 PM
Because he is a F-ing loser and he has no balls to nail her right there and then!

Amray
03-21-2008, 04:07 PM
I think it was just to show his age and how desperate he is. We all know what he is like, evidence of this pops up all over the series.

And their does not need to be any meaning to that scene, I would have done exactly the same thing as he did!

ken 666
04-08-2008, 08:25 AM
neh he is just mentally disturbed with all the sudden events
even real life ppl do tat

Miyabi121190
04-08-2008, 10:18 PM
I watched that episode several times just to understand it and I was still freaked out, especially when the arm turns out looking human and then Ritsuko refers to Unit 01 as if it was female.

Saracin
04-08-2008, 10:21 PM
This is a strange series that centers around both theological symbolism and psychological points. To try and make sense of them all is a chore and takes away from what is a series that seems to shift between the war with the Angels and the attempts by this boy to live a normal life.

Manhattan_Project_2000
04-09-2008, 12:01 AM
This is a strange series that centers around both theological and psychological points. To try and make sense of them all is a chore and takes away from what is a series that seems to shift between the war with the Angels and the attempts by this boy to live a normal life.

Hint: There is no theological meaning in NGE. It has Jewish and Christian Symbolism, no doubt, by the staff admitted that it was used mostly because it looked cool. When the symbolism has meaning, it's a philosophical one.

Moreover, it's completely possible to ignore the meaning behind NGE. Example: Most of the people in this thread.

Saracin
04-09-2008, 12:11 AM
Do you really need to find the meaning behind something though to enjoy it? Sometimes a story is just a story. The creator could say anything, he could make things up to give meaning to something that to him just looked cool so he used it.

I bet it irks you to no end watching people discuss the why of something and you know all the answers and yet no one seems to learn. Or maybe the answer is that they would rather find their own motives out of a characters actions. Its not always about what the artist meant when he made something, its about what people gain from it.

dragongundam009
04-15-2008, 04:28 AM
Do you really need to find the meaning behind something though to enjoy it? Sometimes a story is just a story. The creator could say anything, he could make things up to give meaning to something that to him just looked cool so he used it.

I bet it irks you to no end watching people discuss the why of something and you know all the answers and yet no one seems to learn. Or maybe the answer is that they would rather find their own motives out of a characters actions. Its not always about what the artist meant when he made something, its about what people gain from it.


wow, that deep man.

Amray
04-15-2008, 11:19 AM
Jees, come on guys, it was just a bit of comedy to make the audience laugh.

Digital Dragon
04-15-2008, 12:13 PM
Don't some people just do that to relieve tension?

The Rebel
04-15-2008, 08:46 PM
I myself think I need to rewatch the series. I only seen it on Adultswim, and recall nothing like this happening. Course CN does have a tendancy to not show certaint content. As I recalled the ending episodes they showed made the ending of NGE look like a bad acid trip.

EDIT: Sorry, my bad. I thought this was about the series. I'll see if I can stream the movie and see that. Otherwise just ignore my ignorance.

suzumisaya
04-16-2008, 08:58 PM
I think Evangelion is an anime that goes deep inside in its characters' mind, and what shinji did, was something that was always in his mind, frstly, because he's an adolescent, a that's normal, then, because he's always been pursueded (is ti well written?) by women and lastly I think that he needed that, he saw her and couldn't help it...

omniking3
04-16-2008, 09:08 PM
First of all, he's a teenager. When teenagers need to relieve stress, that what most of them do. 99% of males have masturbated before their 15th birthday, we know you've done it. Secondly, he's gone through a LOT of trauma, a lot of it possibly caused by Asuka. No matter how close Evangelion goes into their minds, you can still only speculate.

Darrmyth
04-16-2008, 09:15 PM
Its not mean't to make sense, that is way they made the original last two episode into the movie and made new episodes that made much more sense, I've seen every single episode of Eva and i even went so far as too buy the dvd box set, The new final ending is just stupid, it is rather lame compared to the original endings, i don't know why he did it, go ask the creators.

Manhattan_Project_2000
04-22-2008, 09:42 AM
Do you really need to find the meaning behind something though to enjoy it? Sometimes a story is just a story. The creator could say anything, he could make things up to give meaning to something that to him just looked cool so he used it.

I bet it irks you to no end watching people discuss the why of something and you know all the answers and yet no one seems to learn. Or maybe the answer is that they would rather find their own motives out of a characters actions. Its not always about what the artist meant when he made something, its about what people gain from it.
You're first argument is null and void, because this isn't a generic anime director, who are almost always talentless hacks, but Hideaki Anno, who is notable for not being a talentless hack. As I mentioned earlier, no hack director would have put such a painful scene in the movie unless he was trying to communicate something. It should be obvious it wasn't freaking fan service.

It doesn't really "irk" me because I expect large numbers of people to be stupid. However, what I do find disturbing is the fact that too many people in this thread are too lazy to even think about analyzing fiction. If they take it at face value, they gain nothing.

To quote Nietzsche: In the mountains, the shortest way is from peak to peak: but for that, you need long legs. Aphorisms should be peaks: and those to whom they are spoken, big and tall.

Datenshi
04-25-2008, 10:41 AM
((I apologize for being persistent but this is a topic I happen to have been thinking a lot about recently. Feh, indulge me.))


However, what I do find disturbing is the fact that too many people in this thread are too lazy to even think about analyzing fiction. If they take it at face value, they gain nothing.

I believe it was a school of German literary critics who defined poetry as "a systematic violence on language". If we treat NGE as a postmodern work of fiction, we could say it is a systematic violence on our senses (namely sight), however the use of violence is rarely meant to be productive. You don't walk away from a French nouveau roman feeling like a fuller person than you were before like you would after, say, reading a bildungsroman by Thomas Mann.

If what you mean by analysis is to decipher symbols and hidden meanings within the text, I am inclined to disagree. Once we allow that, we'll be flooded with different methods of interpretations, each as valid as the last, from the structural methodology interpolated in Northrop Frye's "Anatomy of Criticism" (Tragic, Comic, Thematic), to Barthes' "S/Z" (Hermeneutic, Semic, Proairetic, Symbolic, Cultural) and so on. Like I said, I'm deeply wary in principle of critical literary analysis for just this reason. It all very intellectually stimulating, of course, and in that sense I understand what you mean by "gaining" from the experience (critical scholarship on NGE is actually immense in Japan and it makes for a fun read, I assure you) but it doesn't seem to get us anywhere.

To return to my original point, violence in itself is an meaningless act. However, to enter a movie theatre and be subjected to such an act of volence is an entirely unique experience. My basic argument is that it would not be beyond the director of NGE to insert the scene in question for just that precise effect, not because of some cheap underlying meaning.

Manhattan_Project_2000
04-25-2008, 10:56 PM
((I apologize for being persistent but this is a topic I happen to have been thinking a lot about recently. Feh, indulge me.))



I believe it was a school of German literary critics who defined poetry as "a systematic violence on language". If we treat NGE as a postmodern work of fiction, we could say it is a systematic violence on our senses (namely sight), however the use of violence is rarely meant to be productive. You don't walk away from a French nouveau roman feeling like a fuller person than you were before like you would after, say, reading a bildungsroman by Thomas Mann.

If what you mean by analysis is to decipher symbols and hidden meanings within the text, I am inclined to disagree. Once we allow that, we'll be flooded with different methods of interpretations, each as valid as the last, from the structural methodology interpolated in Northrop Frye's "Anatomy of Criticism" (Tragic, Comic, Thematic), to Barthes' "S/Z" (Hermeneutic, Semic, Proairetic, Symbolic, Cultural) and so on. Like I said, I'm deeply wary in principle of critical literary analysis for just this reason. It all very intellectually stimulating, of course, and in that sense I understand what you mean by "gaining" from the experience (critical scholarship on NGE is actually immense in Japan and it makes for a fun read, I assure you) but it doesn't seem to get us anywhere.

To return to my original point, violence in itself is an meaningless act. However, to enter a movie theatre and be subjected to such an act of volence is an entirely unique experience. My basic argument is that it would not be beyond the director of NGE to insert the scene in question for just that precise effect, not because of some cheap underlying meaning.

My point isn't that they should come to any set meaning, much less the meaning I derived from it, but that they should quit viewing movies from a strictly in-universe view. Your interpretation of the scene is fine, and to a certain extent I agree, but people who can watch that scene and observe nothing more then a boy faping to a girl without questioning WHY the director would put such a scene in there drive me batty. It's like the goons who go to the Louvre and look at nothing but the Mona Lisa.

blackstrike
04-28-2008, 07:54 PM
First of all, he's a teenager. When teenagers need to relieve stress, that what most of them do. 99% of males have masturbated before their 15th birthday, we know you've done it. Secondly, he's gone through a LOT of trauma, a lot of it possibly caused by Asuka. No matter how close Evangelion goes into their minds, you can still only speculate.

i agree 100% with omniking3.

Sanosuke23
04-29-2008, 07:43 AM
You know, I seem to remember there was some displeasure voiced by many fans that didn't understand the ending of the series, and that End of Evangelion was basically giving those fans the ending they wanted. In addition to the various meanings that can be gleaned from such a scene, I can't help but wonder if there's an insult in there to those fans, sort of a "Here's Asuka's boobs, and now this is what you wanted to do, right? Well enjoy."

Sickness
06-18-2008, 12:31 PM
He did it cause he was gay like most people say.
He also did it so Otaku's go crazy.
His ****ed up hand is like dead Kaworu.
He did it because he liked how Asuka looks like, and he always wanted to do that, but he couldn't stand Asuka. So he only aproaches her when she's sleeping, cause she's peacefull then :D thats why its hilarious for me. Imagine Shinji trying to sleep with Asuka but he can't when she's awake, because he thinks that she hates him :D Contra of it, she wants of him to do something, but he is kimochi warui...
So he was a sneaky selfish coward that always gets what he wants... reminds me of my self when I was a kid.
Kaworu and angels are dead, Rei and father are busy, everyone are afk. I'm all alone, and Asuka is naked on the bed, lets see.. what should I do?

wolfgirl90
07-10-2008, 12:08 AM
I think it was because of sexual tension. Both Shinji and Asuka are attracted to each other but neither of them are able to express their feelings properly. Asuka often flirts with Shinji only to turn around and yell and insult him. Shinji does stick up for himself once in a while but eventually stops trying and actually tries to avoid Asuka as the insults become worse. Asuka finds this behavior insulting and disgusting, as she is trying to get his attention and affection, and continues to verbally abuse Shinji, not realizing that she is making the situation much worse!!!:rolleyes:

So, when Shinji eventually saw the object of his "affection" naked, that built up sexual tension finally, pardon the pun, exploded.

FireChibi
07-10-2008, 01:23 AM
clean and simple:
Guys have needs and urges and fantasies

kiwibird
07-10-2008, 09:54 AM
YUP!!
Straight up.
Almost all guys masturbate.
It's not like we're all pervs, we're just built different, most of us experience erections all day without even meaning to. It's just the way we function :/
Do all of us like it? NO! It can lead to embarrassing situations >.<
But it happens and we can't help it..so don't call us pervs..just call us dudes :P

Amray The II
07-10-2008, 11:04 AM
Just ask youselves this.
"If you were directing a film and you made one of the adolescent males masturbate over one of his close female friends..why would you decide to make him do it?"

Personally if I were the director I would have made Shinji do this to show his young age and how desperate he is as an individual and also that sometimes males can get a bit ..horney over nothing as a teenager. I would have also done it for comedy reasons and to show that he is close to Asuka and that he has some interest in her.

It is not weird for a teenager to masturbate. In fact it would worry me if a teenager did not masturbate. It is perfectly normal and something we all basically go through.

Diocletian
07-10-2008, 11:12 AM
Mental issues.He was in a stressful situation.

Evockzi
07-12-2008, 03:46 PM
Last couple episodes were pretty deep at least a lot more indepth about the Character's vs the rest of the Series, But I found the movie to help put a better ending on it since the series didn't really do it for me.

Kibagami
09-09-2008, 10:26 AM
I read some pretty deep opinions in this page. It's interesting how philosophy can be implemented to the actions that are portrayed in any animated film. In the end, I guess it would be left to the interpretation of the viewers and the questionnings of why GAINAX decided for Shinji to do what he did.

I would think that Shinji was just simply aroused by what he was seeing...Teens and young men are experiencing the first insights of sexuality and any erotic image can arouse that curiosity.

megplurttt
09-30-2008, 03:32 AM
In "End of Evengelion" Shinji masturbates over Asuka's comatose body. Is there any meaning to this, why he does it?


as asuka always say shinji is IDIOT..weak :wacko:

Dr. Hax
09-30-2008, 03:39 AM
Shinji masturbates OVER her body?! I didn't know he was into that kind of stuff.

Ridana
10-19-2008, 03:24 AM
I have had many discussions on the deeper meanings of Eva, so no, I am not ignorant of the existence of other meanings. That being said, I think it is fairly arrogant to basically call people morons for accepting his actions at face value. More than that, I would say that it is naive to not understand exactly why they are capable of doing so.

The reason why is "realism". In storytelling/writing it is fairly important, even in an extremely fictitious world, that you keep your characters "in character". Character development can occur over the course of a series, after major events or trauma, or through intellectual conflict, and be completely acceptable. If, for no apparent reason, a character begins acting contrary to the expectations the audience has for that character, then there is a good possibility that the audience will lose interest because the character is no longer believable (regardless of the believabilty of the premise). A good director or writer (the storytellers) would not let that happen, regardless of any artistic philosophy they espouse, and any producer interested in seeing a return on their investment would not allow a director to get away with it if they did.

Without enjoyment there won't be an audience. The storyteller becomes just someone talking to themself, their message is not communicated, and those that would be the audience have gained nothing. So, no matter what message they are trying to express beneath the facade of their art, the storyteller must create an enjoyable facade, a story that draws in the audience so that the audience can be exposed to their message.

In the particular example that's been discussed in this thread, Shinji's actions are part of a long string of scenes examining the relationship between Shinji and Asuka. Within this string, there is a progression of greater sexual tension between them (of course, this tension is only one aspect of their relationship, and that relationship is only one of many that each character deals with). The masturbation scene is a logical and realistic step in the progression, given Shinji's personality (Asuka's personality is irrelavent in the scene as she is unconscious). The scene is acceptable as realistic because we accept: 1) that Shinji has developed sexual interest in Asuka, 2) that Shinji has great difficulty dealing with personal relationships, 3) that Shinji desperately seeks acceptance and goes to self-abusive lengths to avoid rejection and 4) that, when conscious, Asuka would vehemently and sadistically reject Shinji's uncertain advances. If we didn't believe the first point then we would not accept Shinji's actions as realistic, there would be no cause. If we did not know the second we could not excuse Shinji's actions, there would be no empathy. If we did not believe the third and fourth we could not understand the timing, there would be no sense of urgency or opportunity.

While there very well may be another underlying meaning to the scene, what must also be recognized is that our understanding of all of these things, as well as our acceptance of them as realistic, is because we have been led step-by-step to this acceptance by the storyteller, the artist. And that the preponderance of the artist's efforts at this point have not been in creating the underlying message or meaning, but in the creation of the facade.

We are then left with several questions. Was each step insignificant and devoid of meaning because they were only meant to lead us to this "significant" point which was meant to be analyzed? How are we so certain that this is a "significant" point rather than one more step to a greater more significant point? Is it not possible to find significance within the development of the relationship, or entire themes, rather than dissecting it and judging whether certain points are significant or insignificant? Also, if we assume that a sculptor starts with a message and creates a statue, a painter starts with the same message and creates
a painting, and a storyteller starts with the same message and creates a story, then wouldn't it be logical to say that the art is not in the message but in the crafting of the facade to present the message because the message is not intrinsically linked to one medium and it is in the crafting that the artist devotes their time and technique to perfecting?

Within the framework of realism, a character's actions do not need to be analyzed to be understood and it is not apathetic or lazy to accept that reality. As stated before, this needs to be one of the goals of a good storyteller. What's more, realistic character actions outside of the audience's experiences have inherent value, they are exposing, for better or worse, a different view of the world, a mindset other than the audience's own. The audience is capable of making their own value judgments regarding that mindset (for example the posters on this thread who have said things akin to "that's how boys are" or "that's disgusting" or, in Shinji's own words, "I am so f***ed up").

If there is no enjoyment and no meaning to be found in the facade of the art, if appreciation can only be found after painstaking analysis and background research, then what is the purpose of the facade? That would be akin to painting over Starry Night, The Scream, or Mona Lisa with whitewash and claiming that it is not important to actually see and enjoy the paintings, it is only important to understand what the paintings were trying to express.

That is a narrow, sad, and unrealistic view of art.

Realistically, I don't think that anyone actually believes that view, they only claim to believe it because they do not really understand what they are claiming. They also like to inflate their ego and claim superiority by degrading those who have not spent quite as much time with art history books.

In other words, they are masturbating over their understanding of art, which is laying unconscious in front of them.

Sanosuke23
10-19-2008, 03:23 PM
How are we so certain that this is a "significant" point rather than one more step to a greater more significant point? Is it not possible to find significance within the development of the relationship, or entire themes, rather than dissecting it and judging whether certain points are significant or insignificant?

It's entirely possible to find the relationship as a whole the part to analyze, but in the event that you're looking to explore that you'll need to dissect the significant points in the relationship.

Think of it like a war. The relationship is the war. The masturbation scene, the kissing scene, Asuka falling asleep in Shinji's bed, and the scene where he chokes her are all major battles in said war(I'm sure I'm forgetting some, I haven't seen Eva in quite a while). Yes you look at the war, the reasons behind it, the buildup, the conclusion, but if you really want to explore the intricacies of the event you need to look at smaller events that changed the momentum or mark a distinctive point in the war. In the relationship, you have these events within the bigger event that mark some kind of checkpoint.

For instance, we can say with some certainty that while Asuka has a crush on Kaji, she also has an interest in Shinji. The difference being that Kaji is her superior while Shinji is her equal, and so she reacts to them differently. While she's not much more than a needy little girl around Kaji because he's already above her, she instinctively throws up walls and pushes Shinji down to reaffirm her own control over the situation. Otherwise, she fears he'll rise above her and she'll be thrown away again, much like her mother did. For Shinji's part he's naturally insecure and shy, so this works well.

However, as her interest grows she goes from offhanded flirtatious comments to attempting to kiss him. That, I think, is when Shinji stops seeing her as a nuisance and starts reciprocating that interest, at least internally. When she falls asleep next to him, he moves to kiss her because for the first time since they've met she's as vulnerable as he is, but when she says "Mama" he becomes annoyed at the fact that she chides him for being a kid when deep down she's no better.

Fast forward to the scene this is about. Shinji's developed feelings that went from annoyance to somewhat "pure" interest, and this scene shows that it's now definitely sexual. However, he has a great deal of self-loathing because not only did he take advantage of his love interest's unconsciousness, but that seems to be the only time he can act on his feelings. He loves her, he hates her, he lusts after her, and the only time he can do anything about any of it is when she's comatose.

Then there's the choking, but that's after the subject matter of this thread, and I've got somewhere to be, so I'll leave that alone for the time being.

Ridana
10-24-2008, 02:29 AM
Actually, the portion that you quoted above was in reference to a statement that someone else made regarding the director's decision to "leave in" the scene. Their statement inferred that by its mere inclusion the scene must have great and singular significance. My point was less about the particular scene than the logical methodology they used to reach that conclusion, and the flaws of logic it contained.
I knew that there were additional scenes that reference that incident, and purposefully did not mention them, assuming that anyone who had seen EoE would remember them. That is the very fact that nullifies the argument that the scene is singularly significant. Shinji could have done any number of more reprehensible acts in that hospital room or have done nothing, and the EXACT same arguments could be put forth (the scene's innate significance vs. contextual significance).
But even as you point out, the scene has significance in relation to prior events and events which are to come, and can be analyzed as a part of that whole. However, had this scene hit the cutting room floor (as we can assume some scenes did), it would not have prevented us from making an analysis of Shinji and Asuka's relationship and coming to the same conclusions, just as those scenes that were edited into oblivion have not prevented us from finding meaning in what remained.
And again, all of that is secondary to my argument that just having a good story has inheirent meaning, and believing that less in-depth analysis of Eva does not mean that someone is "lazy".

Sanosuke23
10-24-2008, 02:57 AM
Actually, the portion that you quoted above was in reference to a statement that someone else made regarding the director's decision to "leave in" the scene. Their statement inferred that by its mere inclusion the scene must have great and singular significance. My point was less about the particular scene than the logical methodology they used to reach that conclusion, and the flaws of logic it contained.
I knew that there were additional scenes that reference that incident, and purposefully did not mention them, assuming that anyone who had seen EoE would remember them. That is the very fact that nullifies the argument that the scene is singularly significant. Shinji could have done any number of more reprehensible acts in that hospital room or have done nothing, and the EXACT same arguments could be put forth (the scene's innate significance vs. contextual significance).
But even as you point out, the scene has significance in relation to prior events and events which are to come, and can be analyzed as a part of that whole. However, had this scene hit the cutting room floor (as we can assume some scenes did), it would not have prevented us from making an analysis of Shinji and Asuka's relationship and coming to the same conclusions, just as those scenes that were edited into oblivion have not prevented us from finding meaning in what remained.
And again, all of that is secondary to my argument that just having a good story has inheirent meaning, and believing that less in-depth analysis of Eva does not mean that someone is "lazy".

Eh, I was building on your points more than countering them, and I only quoted that piece because quite frankly I couldn't have explained the rest of that point of view better myself.

necropedal
11-21-2008, 04:41 AM
I think that it was his way of at least trying to broaden his emotional and physical horizons, during a time in his life where things were more than just a slight bit turbulent.

That and the fact that like anyone on Earth (Eunuchs excluded), there comes a point where the body must utilize certain genetic predispositions in order to feel some kind of release, in order to feel at least on some level alive.

Manhattan_Project_2000
11-21-2008, 08:11 AM
I have had many discussions on the deeper meanings of Eva, so no, I am not ignorant of the existence of other meanings. That being said, I think it is fairly arrogant to basically call people morons for accepting his actions at face value. More than that, I would say that it is naive to not understand exactly why they are capable of doing so.

The reason why is "realism". In storytelling/writing it is fairly important, even in an extremely fictitious world, that you keep your characters "in character". Character development can occur over the course of a series, after major events or trauma, or through intellectual conflict, and be completely acceptable. If, for no apparent reason, a character begins acting contrary to the expectations the audience has for that character, then there is a good possibility that the audience will lose interest because the character is no longer believable (regardless of the believabilty of the premise). A good director or writer (the storytellers) would not let that happen, regardless of any artistic philosophy they espouse, and any producer interested in seeing a return on their investment would not allow a director to get away with it if they did.

Without enjoyment there won't be an audience. The storyteller becomes just someone talking to themself, their message is not communicated, and those that would be the audience have gained nothing. So, no matter what message they are trying to express beneath the facade of their art, the storyteller must create an enjoyable facade, a story that draws in the audience so that the audience can be exposed to their message.

In the particular example that's been discussed in this thread, Shinji's actions are part of a long string of scenes examining the relationship between Shinji and Asuka. Within this string, there is a progression of greater sexual tension between them (of course, this tension is only one aspect of their relationship, and that relationship is only one of many that each character deals with). The masturbation scene is a logical and realistic step in the progression, given Shinji's personality (Asuka's personality is irrelavent in the scene as she is unconscious). The scene is acceptable as realistic because we accept: 1) that Shinji has developed sexual interest in Asuka, 2) that Shinji has great difficulty dealing with personal relationships, 3) that Shinji desperately seeks acceptance and goes to self-abusive lengths to avoid rejection and 4) that, when conscious, Asuka would vehemently and sadistically reject Shinji's uncertain advances. If we didn't believe the first point then we would not accept Shinji's actions as realistic, there would be no cause. If we did not know the second we could not excuse Shinji's actions, there would be no empathy. If we did not believe the third and fourth we could not understand the timing, there would be no sense of urgency or opportunity.

While there very well may be another underlying meaning to the scene, what must also be recognized is that our understanding of all of these things, as well as our acceptance of them as realistic, is because we have been led step-by-step to this acceptance by the storyteller, the artist. And that the preponderance of the artist's efforts at this point have not been in creating the underlying message or meaning, but in the creation of the facade.

We are then left with several questions. Was each step insignificant and devoid of meaning because they were only meant to lead us to this "significant" point which was meant to be analyzed? How are we so certain that this is a "significant" point rather than one more step to a greater more significant point? Is it not possible to find significance within the development of the relationship, or entire themes, rather than dissecting it and judging whether certain points are significant or insignificant? Also, if we assume that a sculptor starts with a message and creates a statue, a painter starts with the same message and creates
a painting, and a storyteller starts with the same message and creates a story, then wouldn't it be logical to say that the art is not in the message but in the crafting of the facade to present the message because the message is not intrinsically linked to one medium and it is in the crafting that the artist devotes their time and technique to perfecting?

Within the framework of realism, a character's actions do not need to be analyzed to be understood and it is not apathetic or lazy to accept that reality. As stated before, this needs to be one of the goals of a good storyteller. What's more, realistic character actions outside of the audience's experiences have inherent value, they are exposing, for better or worse, a different view of the world, a mindset other than the audience's own. The audience is capable of making their own value judgments regarding that mindset (for example the posters on this thread who have said things akin to "that's how boys are" or "that's disgusting" or, in Shinji's own words, "I am so f***ed up").

If there is no enjoyment and no meaning to be found in the facade of the art, if appreciation can only be found after painstaking analysis and background research, then what is the purpose of the facade? That would be akin to painting over Starry Night, The Scream, or Mona Lisa with whitewash and claiming that it is not important to actually see and enjoy the paintings, it is only important to understand what the paintings were trying to express.

That is a narrow, sad, and unrealistic view of art.

Realistically, I don't think that anyone actually believes that view, they only claim to believe it because they do not really understand what they are claiming. They also like to inflate their ego and claim superiority by degrading those who have not spent quite as much time with art history books.

In other words, they are masturbating over their understanding of art, which is laying unconscious in front of them.
Sorry, I rarely visit this forum.

Protip: Movie is Postmodern. Ergo, you should interpret it like a postmodern movie. That's the entire point.

And let's be fair, I'm not saying you can't go into the character interactions and find some enjoyment, I'm saying that the majority of the people in this thread aren't even doing that.

The average post in this thread is: Dude + Half naked loli = Profit

They aren't questioning WHY Shinji would fap to an unconscious Asuka, they are justifying why a stereotypical teen would fap to a half naked coma chick. And they certainly aren't thinking about the scene as having any significance outside of the realm of fan service.

Tasuke
11-21-2008, 10:49 AM
in my fifteen years of Anime fandom, i've never once seen anything about EVANGELION that has ever piqued my interest in the slightest. all this only reaffirms my resolution; too much thought and introspection upon things will drive one to madness. Anime to me is a happy-fluffy fantasy world, and i am happy to keep it that way. i get enough challenging stimuli out of the real world, thank you very much...

Funkgun
11-21-2008, 11:13 PM
in my fifteen years of Anime fandom, i've never once seen anything about EVANGELION that has ever piqued my interest in the slightest. all this only reaffirms my resolution; too much thought and introspection upon things will drive one to madness. Anime to me is a happy-fluffy fantasy world, and i am happy to keep it that way. i get enough challenging stimuli out of the real world, thank you very much...

Well other than I am one of those few who really disliked the movie. The series is much more interesting. It really shows the lighter side turning dark as the story progresses. The movie (which this scene is from) Was in my book a major middle finger to the fans of the series who demanded a "real" end to the TV from the director, and boy did they get it.

The unique designs of the show and philosophical merit in which it was derived, makes it one, I think a long time fan of anime should at least give a chance on.
This one particular instance in the movie is not a real worth wile reason to avoid it all together.

I am however one of the proponents that it is a series that was not as earth shaking as all the hype given it. However, it does end up being one that gets talked about years after it's release. Not very many get that distinction.

Anyhow, there are a set of movies that are coming out in Japan. That are a retell of the series. Maybe if you are not wanting to follow though with the series, you could just wait till all of them are released, and just watch them. #1 came out last year, #2 is either out now, or out soon, # 3 next year, and #4 (the end) is slated for the year after.

BamaPaganGamer
11-23-2008, 01:15 AM
I came into this thread with some thoughts, seen them all more artfully conveyed than I can, so I'll say:

Yes, realistically, this is both a display of Shinji's needs and inability to express them to Asuka for fear of almost-assured rejection. This is also what, honestly, from my own experience, happens with a couple with a submissive man and completely dominant marauding woman: She's her sexiest and most loveable when she's not glaring and screaming at you...which in some cases, only when she's asleep.

I would however, like to argue against the theory that there is no major religious point here. However, rather than take the time to refresh myself on the theory I spent WAY too much time pondering how Rei became God through being at all ten Sephiroth of the Qaballistic Tree of Life, and Shinji became Adam, and Asuka Eve, all at once...but it's late, I'm tired, and it's not exactly a great argument for this thread. Gnight folks.

Manhattan_Project_2000
11-23-2008, 09:37 AM
Well other than I am one of those few who really disliked the movie. The series is much more interesting. It really shows the lighter side turning dark as the story progresses. The movie (which this scene is from) Was in my book a major middle finger to the fans of the series who demanded a "real" end to the TV from the director, and boy did they get it.

The unique designs of the show and philosophical merit in which it was derived, makes it one, I think a long time fan of anime should at least give a chance on.
This one particular instance in the movie is not a real worth wile reason to avoid it all together.

I am however one of the proponents that it is a series that was not as earth shaking as all the hype given it. However, it does end up being one that gets talked about years after it's release. Not very many get that distinction.

Anyhow, there are a set of movies that are coming out in Japan. That are a retell of the series. Maybe if you are not wanting to follow though with the series, you could just wait till all of them are released, and just watch them. #1 came out last year, #2 is either out now, or out soon, # 3 next year, and #4 (the end) is slated for the year after.
Well, "Earth Shaking" is based on popular opinion in a demographic, and most Animu fans think it is/was one of greatest Animus ever created. The only animu that continues to get anywhere near as much conversation years after it's release is Akira.

Funkgun
11-25-2008, 12:58 AM
Well, "Earth Shaking" is based on popular opinion in a demographic, and most Animu fans think it is/was one of greatest Animus ever created. The only animu that continues to get anywhere near as much conversation years after it's release is Akira.
Exactly, like I said here
However, it does end up being one that gets talked about years after it's release ... Not very many get that distinction. Heck I bet only 5/6 shows are on that list of continued interest well past a 10 -20 year gap. I was actually responding to someone who I think was turned off, to the series by reading this one sequence, i was actually trying to change their mind to the series. :)
I was however, just placating my opinion of why I liked the TV end better than the movie. Also, I was trying to give an argument to just watch the series if the thought of Shinji's scene in the movie, was a turn off. And that in my time I hold some other series in higher regard to establishing, or changing how animation is done. Not weather or not it is one of the best of all time.
I just thought of it not as earth shaking, but controversial and thought provoking. I feel Gundam or Ideon is more important to establishing Mecha titles as they are now, and also making a series more adult with an ending where everyone dies. Or Orange Road with a movie that redefined how a lighthearted series could end dramatically using a movie. Or Dallos being the first OAV, starting a new market. And there are others that broke the mold.

The unique designs of the show and philosophical merit in which it was derived, makes it one, I think a long time fan of anime should at least give a chance on. like I say here, I am definitely a big fan of the series/manga/newest movie (and I hope the other 3) and would recommend it as a must see.

Truth be told, over the spectrum of fans of anime it is always at the top of lists, and I know that only the cream of the crop raises to the top.


I should receive a pie to the face for rhyming....
In the future I will make sure to be a little more specific about using "In my opinion" and such. :)

thesaint
11-28-2008, 01:17 AM
They prob just wanted to add in a controversial scene (so people would bring it up and talk about the series) or something to bring the maturity level up.

necropedal
12-13-2008, 08:21 AM
Then unfortunately for you Master Tasuke, I believe you have missed out on alot of life's joys.

Although there are, simply put, "fun" aspects to life, it is vitally important to one's sense of reality and sense of being that you simply consider.
I am not talking in a matter of fact way, but am speaking existentially.

For to be without thought regarding a particular subject is to not really understand its intention, for the most engrossing series and the most in-depth moments of our lives, we are constantly on a never ending trek towards discovery. It is this discovery that refreshes the mind and satiates the soul.

I for one am a practitioner of one thing, and that is letting my mind consider every facet about a myriad of subjects and analyze them until I feel satisfied that I have reached a worthwhile resolution to the issues raised by the subjects.

Albeit taking the time to undertake this endeavor is taxing on ones mentality, it is important that we not forget one of the major tenets of our existence and that is to not let our minds become stale and not allow them to fester, for that will surely lead to an eventual downfall, one far worse than death itself.

An inactive mind is prone to constant bombardments by the curse of mental infirmary, whether it be dementia, or any of the degenerative neurological disorders plaguing our world in their insidious manner.

If you are to truly value that which we as humans value most above all else, that being, life itself, you must not let face value simply satisfy you, and most certainly not let it influence you.

I have spent 12 of my near 21 years on this Earth contemplating the nature of things, from the seemingly insignificant, to the life altering. The one thing I have found is that there is simply so much out there to be explored, whether it be out in the furthest reaches of space our right here within ourselves.

Shows like Evangelion show us so much about human nature and so much about ourselves, to the point that I question everyone as to whether or not they can't see at least a single part of themselves within all of the characters of the show.

I guarantee you that after careful deliberation, the answer will undoubtedly be "Yes, I can". This is a step in the right direction, a step towards self-awarness, whether or not you are prepared for it.

Life itself is far more an intriguing interwoven tapestry than some might let on, but for those out there willing to go that step further and really learn about all of the facets that make up this mortal coil. I congratulate you and wish you luck on your journey.

As previously touched upon, the act by Shinji of masturbating over Asuka's comatose body, was a way for him to evolve as a human being, he was ready to make the next step in understanding that which surrounds him. This act, as it is seen worldwide is marked down in the Akashic Records of humanity as a modern-day rite of passage undertaken by every male and female alike.

For the first time in his existence he is truly exploring the form of man in relation to the form of woman, the underlying attraction aside for a moment, there is a time when everyone must begin this process, devoid of who they are.

Some choose to react to a specific stimulus in order to experience this feeling of self-gratification or self-deprecation (depending on one's viewpoint), others may just simply choose to experiment with themselves unbeknown of the full extent of the causality behind their decision.

FLASH-X
12-20-2008, 01:48 AM
i agree with necro any ways including a scene of masturbation is not bad man it just brings out a fun side and increases the maturity level of animu

Brandandy
01-03-2009, 05:19 PM
IDK why....but it freaked me out a little:confused:.

JIMBO.
01-03-2009, 10:50 PM
I liked it better in the movie where he choked her at the end

I hate asuka

Gnosis
01-10-2009, 10:43 AM
The question arises whether Shinji was too weak/scared to actually rape Asuka (note: I am in no ways condoning rape of any kind) or whether Shinji knew it would be wrong, but masturbating to her naked body would be an acceptable compromise?

Pastel-pure
01-10-2009, 03:26 PM
ever wonder if the creators just got really really bored when they did that scene . does it actually have to have a meaning , I mean you don't watch anime to spend time deciphering why shinji masturbated over asuka , I mean just would you really want to tell someone thats what you did with your day i.e
"what'd you do today"
"oh i went on anime forum and talked about the reasons behind why shinji masturbates over asuka"
"uhhh isn't shinji in that anime Evangelion or something"
"like no DUH"
"what ever creep"
I can just imagine it , anyway my hypothesis is based on the fact that the people who make anime can get notoriusly bored with plot and mess with it .

Gnosis
01-10-2009, 07:22 PM
"what'd you do today"
"oh i went on anime forum and talked about the reasons behind why shinji masturbates over asuka"
"uhhh isn't shinji in that anime Evangelion or something"
"like no DUH"
"what ever creep"
I can just imagine it , anyway my hypothesis is based on the fact that the people who make anime can get notoriusly bored with plot and mess with it .

You have just given me a new flirting technique. ;)

Xombii
01-10-2009, 07:59 PM
Laws of anime
*#50- Law of Artistic Perversion- Most (not all) Anime artists are perverts

Gnosis
01-11-2009, 09:31 AM
Most (not all) people are perverted.

TheDesertFox
02-03-2009, 01:22 PM
The fact that he masturbated over her body shows that his mental state was to weak to accept rejection and so he took advantage of her while she could not reject him.

DustyBannister
02-10-2009, 02:47 AM
I see where you're coming from, but following the same thought, humans would also be considered angels, as they were created from Lilith. And if everyone's an angel, doesn't it loose the value?
So I haven't studied Evangelion much because the first time I seen the series was a straight through marathon when when I was 14 with friends(so I didn't get a chance to take much in and was catatonic after getting to far into the show and being up all night), but I just recently got a chance to start really watching the show(not even half way done yet though), but wasn't there one part where they were examining some kind of data collected from an angel and they mention some kind wave patern being close to that of humans?

Just bringing that point up incase it is relivent.

Andrelisa8035
02-12-2009, 01:58 AM
Lost is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American serial drama television series. It follows the lives of plane crash survivors on a mysterious tropical island, after a commercial passenger jet flying between Sydney, Australia and Los Angeles, United States crashes somewhere in the South Pacific. Each episode typically features a primary storyline on the island as well as a secondary storyline from another point in a character's life. The series was created by Damon Lindelof, J. J. Abrams and Jeffrey Lieber, and is filmed primarily on location in Oahu, Hawaii. The pilot episode was first broadcast on September 22, 2004.[2] Since then, four seasons have aired. Lost 1-4 dvd (http://www.dvdmsn.com/US$49.00-Lost-The-Complete-Seasons-1-4-DVD-boxset-p-232.html) is produced by ABC Studios, Bad Robot Productions and Grass Skirt Productions and airs on the ABC Network in the United States. Its soundtrack is composed by Michael Giacchino. The current executive producers are Abrams, Lindelof, Bryan Burk, Jack Bender and Carlton Cuse. Due to its large ensemble cast and the cost of filming in Hawaii, the series is one of the most expensive on television.

Qoo
02-13-2009, 12:58 PM
Lost is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American serial drama television series. It follows the lives of plane crash survivors on a mysterious tropical island, after a commercial passenger jet flying between Sydney, Australia and Los Angeles, United States crashes somewhere in the South Pacific. Each episode typically features a primary storyline on the island as well as a secondary storyline from another point in a character's life. The series was created by Damon Lindelof, J. J. Abrams and Jeffrey Lieber, and is filmed primarily on location in Oahu, Hawaii. The pilot episode was first broadcast on September 22, 2004.[2] Since then, four seasons have aired. Lost 1-4 dvd (http://www.dvdmsn.com/US$49.00-Lost-The-Complete-Seasons-1-4-DVD-boxset-p-232.html) is produced by ABC Studios, Bad Robot Productions and Grass Skirt Productions and airs on the ABC Network in the United States. Its soundtrack is composed by Michael Giacchino. The current executive producers are Abrams, Lindelof, Bryan Burk, Jack Bender and Carlton Cuse. Due to its large ensemble cast and the cost of filming in Hawaii, the series is one of the most expensive on television.

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj215/alice_death/wat.png

blackrosetwilight
02-13-2009, 04:53 PM
Lost is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American serial drama television series. It follows the lives of plane crash survivors on a mysterious tropical island, after a commercial passenger jet flying between Sydney, Australia and Los Angeles, United States crashes somewhere in the South Pacific. Each episode typically features a primary storyline on the island as well as a secondary storyline from another point in a character's life. The series was created by Damon Lindelof, J. J. Abrams and Jeffrey Lieber, and is filmed primarily on location in Oahu, Hawaii. The pilot episode was first broadcast on September 22, 2004.[2] Since then, four seasons have aired. Lost 1-4 dvd (http://www.dvdmsn.com/US$49.00-Lost-The-Complete-Seasons-1-4-DVD-boxset-p-232.html) is produced by ABC Studios, Bad Robot Productions and Grass Skirt Productions and airs on the ABC Network in the United States. Its soundtrack is composed by Michael Giacchino. The current executive producers are Abrams, Lindelof, Bryan Burk, Jack Bender and Carlton Cuse. Due to its large ensemble cast and the cost of filming in Hawaii, the series is one of the most expensive on television.
Yes this is exactly why Shinji masterbated over Asuka good going. He masterbated over Asuka because of Lost winning an Emmy. Oh how did you figure that out? You are sooooo smart please do tell more.